Keith Olbermann: A Letterman Appreciation – You Know Him, You Love Him, You Can’t Live Without Him

Originally posted on Deadline:

My perspective on David Letterman is a little different, I think, than most of his other frequent-but-really-not-that-big-a-deal guests. For one thing, while I can still be freshly awestruck by his intelligence and his creative genius, I like his humanity even more. The thing I like most about Dave is Dave.

Plus, I had been a fan for 25 years before I was ever on the show, and I had managed to meet him at NBC even though neither of us worked there. I was just leaving 30 Rock to get back to ESPN when I heard this very familiar voice shout my name and then, “What the hell are you doing here?” I explained, with a mixture of surprise and pride, that Bryant Gumbel had brought me down from Connecticut to be the sports guy on a panel for the Today show year in review for 1994. Without missing…

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Everything at Once: Notes to My Son

Originally posted on Jonathan Hiskes:

Originally published in River Teeth, Spring 2015. (Subscribe here; River Teeth is great, and it’s named after an excellent David James Duncan essay.)

Puget Sound from San Juan Island

June

We returned from the hospital, our family, and immediately I shrugged the bags off my shoulder and set to work unpacking dirty clothes. I’ve always had this compulsion to unpack right away, always in a hurry to restore order. Then I turned to watch your mother. Unshowered, still exhausted from labor, she lifted you from the car seat into her arms. “This is our couch,” she whispered, walking softly. “This is our kitchen.”

You won’t comprehend any of this for months, you shriveled, squinting creature. You haven’t even learned to hold your eyes open. Yet Hannah paced the house, letting the familiar squeaks in the floor comfort herself, if not you. I stopped to watch–the laundry could wait. She showed you the nursery…

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The French Approach to “Anti-racism”: Pretty Words and Magical Thinking

Originally posted on Aware of Awareness:

I first came to France twelve years ago during my junior year abroad. I was the first person in my family to get a passport and I could barely contain my excitement. In the winter of 2003, two years before the riots that followed the untimely deaths of 15 year old Zyed Benna and 17 year old Bouna Traore, I landed in Paris bright-eyed and bushy tailed, armed with a very shaky grasp of French and a naive fascination with this beautiful country.

As an African-American, I was vaguely aware that France did not deal with issues of race the way we do in the United States. And when I happened to forget, French white people were keen to remind me. In one of the sociology classes I took at a university in the south of France, I hesitantly raised my hand to ask a question. The white French professor had…

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Shooting great pictures has never been so difficult

Originally posted on tobylitt:

It is saying the opposite of the thing I am saying It is saying the opposite of the thing I am about to say

I saw this advertisement in the window of a shop on Tottenham Court Road, and took a photograph of it.

Annoyed by the blandness of this as a statement – Shooting great pictures has never been so easy – and, in a similar way to my question about minimal aesthetics, I have a question about photography.

Immediate aside: It’s hard to write this without sounding anti-technology. I am not – really, I’m not; (photography, pretty obviously, is technological in toto); I’m not even anti-digital (not completely).

I believe, however, that there’s an intensity of attention that is forced upon an artist by a lack of technology, or lack of easy and helpful and well-designed technology. And that, if there isn’t that deprivation of ease, there can’t be that intensity.

(This might be a.k.a. ‘the uses of adversity’, or what Yeats had as…

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Growing Up Millennial

Originally posted on The Captain's Speech:

Screen Shot 2015-05-09 at 3.54.51 AMAs a person born in the 90s, I am classified as a millennial, which means I am everything that is wrong with the world today. I stare at a screen instead of talking to people. I expect everything handed to me. I am lazy. I binge watch television shows. I overuse the word “binge”. I expect a trophy when I fail. I take selfies everywhere. I am narcissistic. I am entitled. I don’t read the newspaper. I spend too much time on “The Twitter.”

Or at least that’s how I’m categorized.

As if I’m a book and my date of birth is the summary on the back, telling everyone exactly what I’m about.

I feel as though there is a sense of pride that people have for growing up when they did. I look back on the 90s and am thrilled to call that decade my childhood. Just as people born in…

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Essay: Pace by Kinzy Janssen

Originally posted on JMWW:

My parents’ next-door neighbors keep binoculars on their window sill, next to a Birds of North America identification booklet. In the center of their lawn, an orange extension cord pumps electricity to a birdbath like a vein to a giant heart.

This is how my mom and dad can tell that Stan and Lisa are really serious about birds.

My parents are fascinated by this sudden pursuit yet unwilling to join, as if to do so would necessitate crossing a threshold. Today, they watch their neighbors watching the birds, watch Stan unhinging birdfeeder roofs and scooping birdseed, watch Lisa hanging suet in the maples, almost tripping over the family dog at her feet.

From their windowed vantage point, my mom and dad hold mugs of coffee and lean in close, their rings sometimes tapping against the glass.

How did they get so old? My mom asks.

*

When I was…

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The Myth of Comprehensive Data

Originally posted on Dart-Throwing Chimp:

“What about using Twitter sentiment?”

That suggestion came to me from someone at a recent Data Science DC meetup, after I’d given a short talk on assessing risks of mass atrocities for the Early Warning Project, and as the next speaker started his presentation on predicting social unrest. I had devoted the first half of my presentation to a digression of sorts, talking about how the persistent scarcity of relevant public data still makes it impossible to produce global forecasts of rare political crises—things like coups, insurgencies, regime breakdowns, and mass atrocities—that are as sharp and dynamic as we would like.

The meetup wasn’t the first time I’d heard that suggestion, and I think all of the well-intentioned people who have made it to me have believed that data derived from Twitter would escape or overcome those constraints. In fact, the Twitter stream embodies them. Over the past two decades, technological, economic, and political changes have…

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The Sounds of AHH by Kurt Hugo Schneider & Kevin Olu [Full-HD]

CUPS!! – Pitch Perfect – Sam Tsui, Alex G, Kina Grannis, Kurt Schneider

Here is another song with some of the people from the Coke song.

Pass It On – COKE BOTTLE SONG!! – ft. Kina, Max, Sam, Alex G, KHS, Diamond

Saw this on Facebook and thought people would like to see this.

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My Favorate Songs

[cincopa AoGAwyruPiie]
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